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Thread: 2018 Gold Wing butt test drive - observations & commentary

  1. #21
    Member keller123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doubleh View Post
    Any specifics in comparison to the F6B as far as ride, performance, handling, comfort? Also, how was the DTC trans? Although I've never rode a motorcycle with this type of trans, I doubt I would care for it.
    Thanks
    Yeah I test drove the tour, with the full top case, and the maneuverability was the same if not better than the F6B! That part of the bike I was really impressed. Of course there's less vibration from the front, I would say reduced about 60% from the F6B due to the new front suspension, I am not a fan of the DCT for the short time that I was on the bike, about 30 minutes, I know people try to compare it to a car, but there's no comparison with an automatic motorcycle compared to an automatic car. For me I didn't like it, I want to be able to Glide up to a stop pulling in the clutch, also forget about slow Maneuvers using the brake and throttle, you can't do it with the DCT to my knowledge. In all fairness, people that have gotten the DCT say you do get used to it, in knowing where the bike wants your hand on the throttle, I just still prefer manual, I did a YouTube video on the 15000 mile review of the F6B that I talked about this extensively so you may want to Google it. The Comfort was great, you do get a little more wind, at least I got more wind since I have a mad stad on my F6B
    When the world seems to be working against you. Drop everything and go for a ride!

  2. #22
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    2013 F6B to 2018 Goldwing

    From a 2013 F6B to a 2018 Goldwing DCT
    Some background:
    I have been riding for more than 50 years and I have owned many, many bikes; the most recent are listed below (obviously, some were owned simultaneously). The mileage given for each bike is the approximate mileage indicated when I got rid of the named bike.

    1997 Valkyrie Tourer (Black – 45,000 miles)
    1999 Valkyrie Interstate (Black – 48,000 miles)
    2001 Goldwing (Black – 125,000 miles)
    2004 Goldwing (Silver 15,000 miles)
    2005 Honda VTX 1800 (maroon and black, 15,000 miles)
    2007 Kawasaki 1600 Mean Streak (black with flames, 7,000 miles)
    2008 Goldwing (Red – 92,000 miles)
    2013 F6B (Black, 7,500 miles, wrecked)
    2013 F6B (Black, 75,000 miles)
    2018 Goldwing (Silver, new, presently ~1000 miles)

    I recently rode my 2013 F6B from my home in Hurricane, UT, to Sierra Vista, AZ, circa 600 miles, where I traded it for a silver 2018 Goldwing DCT which I then rode from Sierra Vista back to Hurricane, UT. In what follows, I will seek to compare my 2018 Goldwing with my 2013 F6B and two other bikes that I have test-ridden recently.
    First of all, the appearance:



    As they say, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. In my opinion, the F6B was the most esthetically pleasing big Honda every made, at least until the 2018 model appeared. Now, I am uncertain as to which is the best looking. The downward slope of the fairing on the F6B, picked up by the slope traced on the side bags was inspired. The second generation Goldwing (2012 – 2017) had the same basic lines, but the effect was destroyed when Honda decided to go on the cheap, and carry over the first generation trunk to the second generation Wing; BIG mistake Honda.
    To compare the F6B styling to the styling of the 2018 Goldwing is sort of an apples vs oranges sort of thing. The styling of the new Wing is “edgy”; it reflects a more contemporary motif and clearly takes some getting used to. I like it a lot, but I can certainly see why many would hold that the F6B is more attractive.
    Why did I trade bikes?
    In the past 6 months I have test-ridden the Indian Chieftain, the BMW 1600B, my F6B and the 2018 Goldwing.
    The Indian is nicely finished, has adequate but not exciting power, and it is fairly smooth for a twin. However, riding an air-cooled V-twin in southern Utah, where summer temperatures are routinely in triple digits (and the second digit is not always zero) is, IMO, out of the question. Besides, in the year 2018 I don’t fancy a bike that looks like something you might find under a dusty tarp in your grandfather’s barn.
    The BMW 1600B is a beautiful bike, impeccably finished, smooth and comfortable, it handles superbly, and the power, OMG the power, is out of this world. However, having owned two BMW “Z” cars, I am reluctant to rejoin the Teutonic admiration society. Put another way, BMW dealers (and owners?) have been known to have serious attitude problems.
    The F6B is an amazing bike and I loved it. It is smooth, powerful, reliable, comfortable, handles beautifully and it’s gorgeous. Unfortunately, its electronics are outdated, cruise control came late to the party (BIG mistake Honda), the stock suspension is not remarkable, and it desperately needs another gear. Here in the southwest, where speed limits are frequently 80 MPH, and people routinely drive 90 MPH, the engine spinning in the area of 3500 rpm can get a bit tiring on a long trip.
    The 2018 Goldwing is a thoroughly modern motorcycle with every imaginable bell and whistle. It is smooth, modestly more powerful than its predecessors, the front suspension is simply amazing, and it is a bit lighter than the previous models. Standard features include, but are not limited to, navigation, cruise control, ABS brakes, electric windshield, Apple Play, throttle by wire, key-fob access, and four riding modes (Tour, Sport (exciting!), Economy and Rain). With the available DCT transmission it also provides a forward and reverse “walking” mode and paddle-shifting if you select the manual mode.
    The down-sides of this bike, compared to the F6B, include smaller side bags, a slightly higher seat, and a smaller gas tank (although I have found the range to be about the same because of better mileage). And, unfortunately, there is the much higher price!
    It is the best bike I have ever ridden by a substantial margin, followed by the F6B. On a long trip, at least on my 600 mile trip returning to Utah from Arizona, I found it more relaxing than the F6B because of the automatic transmission, which is amazingly smooth and convenient, and the lower RPM (reduced 5-600 RPM compared to the F6B) at cruising speed.
    It is no exaggeration to say that this bike brings the motorcycle to a new level of comfort and sophistication. If I had to use one term to characterize riding this bike with the DCT transmission it would be “relaxing.” The seat is good, it is only spinning circa 2500 rpm at 75 mph, and the wind protection is adequate; perhaps a bit less than the previous Wing models, but good enough. And, there are genuine Honda add-ons to increase the wind protection.
    In terms of passenger comfort, there is a bit of controversy. Yes, it is pretty hard to top the “princess” seat of the earlier Wing models, but many test-passengers have rated the new Wing as “comfortable” and a few even thought it was more comfortable than previous Wing models. It is going to depend on the rider. The passenger seat no longer “surrounds” the rider like it did on the earlier models and the passenger “grab” handles are not very conveniently placed.
    The available luggage space is a lot less – no question about that. This is likely the most serious and non-controversial failing of the bike.
    If you want to play, you can hustle the DCT bike through canyons in the “sport” mode and give most sport bikes and crotch rockets a good run. It handles beautifully under all conditions; never a twitch, no “hinge in the middle”, and the automatic shifting is so smooth that it does not upset even the tightest line.
    All of that and the new suspension is so compliant that it has to be experienced to be believed.
    The 7-speed DCT transmission is really the piece de resistance here. I was originally skeptical and, in fact, my original order was for a standard 6-speed. Take it from me - you DO NOT want to do that. The DCT is simply marvelous.
    You start this bike with a tap of the start button (just like your car, just tap the start button and the computer takes over and starts the motor).
    The bike comes to life in neutral and in “tour” mode. Press “D” (drive) and just twist the throttle and you are going. The automatic shifting is smooth and positive. If you are in “sport” mode and you grab a whole handful on start-up, you will flatten your eyeballs.
    It down-shifts automatically when you come to a stop. The computer even seems to sense when you hit the brakes on a steep down-slope at speed, and drops down a gear to aid you in the braking; VERY slick.
    Or, if you want to make a quick pass, just hit the “down-shift” button on the left handle bar with your thumb and accelerate to pass; the transmission will then smoothly up-shift when you ease off the throttle after the pass.
    If you set the manual mode the rider is in control of the shift points with the paddle shifters. The paddle shift controls are perfectly placed ergonomically. In manual mode, the transmission will down shift, as required, when you come to a stop but it will NOT up-shift automatically.
    “Walking mode” lets you maneuver forward and back using the paddle shift controls; the down-shift button for reverse, the up-shift button for forward. This is VERY convenient for parking.
    I have never ridden the 6-speed, manual transmission bike. However, the reports from some of the testers suggest that it is much improved in terms of smoothness compared to the previous Wings.
    Finally, Honda is attempting to change the Goldwing culture, a notoriously reactionary culture, with this svelte and more “athletic” new Wing. I, for one, am happy to get with the program, but I wait and watch with interest to see what the consensus of the Goldwing community will be.
    I think that Honda hit it out of the park with this new bike!

    John Marshall
    Hurricane, UT

  3. #23
    Senior Member
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    Commerce Twp.MI USA
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    John, Thanks for the great review of the 2018 Goldwing..I am 78 this year and age is slowing me down at bit, but I might consider trading my 2013 F6B for the new one. Your bike history is almost identical to mine and years of riding about the same..I put far less miles on bikes than you living in Michigan, but still enjoy riding when I can..Originally from Provo, raised in Denver and have family currently in Southern Utah and surrounding area...(lucky guy)..I have not yet ridden the new version of the bike but hope to soon...Leaning toward the base version with manual transmission at this point as I rarely ride more than 150 miles at one time anymore..Good luck with your new ride and hope all works out...BTW, I will probably wait until the fall to get serious about trading and perhaps able to make a deal on one around then...Regards and ride safe

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by keller123 View Post
    Yeah I test drove the tour, with the full top case, and the maneuverability was the same if not better than the F6B! That part of the bike I was really impressed. Of course there's less vibration from the front, I would say reduced about 60% from the F6B due to the new front suspension, I am not a fan of the DCT for the short time that I was on the bike, about 30 minutes, I know people try to compare it to a car, but there's no comparison with an automatic motorcycle compared to an automatic car. For me I didn't like it, I want to be able to Glide up to a stop pulling in the clutch, also forget about slow Maneuvers using the brake and throttle, you can't do it with the DCT to my knowledge. In all fairness, people that have gotten the DCT say you do get used to it, in knowing where the bike wants your hand on the throttle, I just still prefer manual, I did a YouTube video on the 15000 mile review of the F6B that I talked about this extensively so you may want to Google it. The Comfort was great, you do get a little more wind, at least I got more wind since I have a mad stad on my F6B
    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane View Post
    From a 2013 F6B to a 2018 Goldwing DCT
    Some background:
    I have been riding for more than 50 years and I have owned many, many bikes; the most recent are listed below (obviously, some were owned simultaneously). The mileage given for each bike is the approximate mileage indicated when I got rid of the named bike.

    1997 Valkyrie Tourer (Black – 45,000 miles)
    1999 Valkyrie Interstate (Black – 48,000 miles)
    2001 Goldwing (Black – 125,000 miles)
    2004 Goldwing (Silver 15,000 miles)
    2005 Honda VTX 1800 (maroon and black, 15,000 miles)
    2007 Kawasaki 1600 Mean Streak (black with flames, 7,000 miles)
    2008 Goldwing (Red – 92,000 miles)
    2013 F6B (Black, 7,500 miles, wrecked)
    2013 F6B (Black, 75,000 miles)
    2018 Goldwing (Silver, new, presently ~1000 miles)

    I recently rode my 2013 F6B from my home in Hurricane, UT, to Sierra Vista, AZ, circa 600 miles, where I traded it for a silver 2018 Goldwing DCT which I then rode from Sierra Vista back to Hurricane, UT. In what follows, I will seek to compare my 2018 Goldwing with my 2013 F6B and two other bikes that I have test-ridden recently.
    First of all, the appearance:



    As they say, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. In my opinion, the F6B was the most esthetically pleasing big Honda every made, at least until the 2018 model appeared. Now, I am uncertain as to which is the best looking. The downward slope of the fairing on the F6B, picked up by the slope traced on the side bags was inspired. The second generation Goldwing (2012 – 2017) had the same basic lines, but the effect was destroyed when Honda decided to go on the cheap, and carry over the first generation trunk to the second generation Wing; BIG mistake Honda.
    To compare the F6B styling to the styling of the 2018 Goldwing is sort of an apples vs oranges sort of thing. The styling of the new Wing is “edgy”; it reflects a more contemporary motif and clearly takes some getting used to. I like it a lot, but I can certainly see why many would hold that the F6B is more attractive.
    Why did I trade bikes?
    In the past 6 months I have test-ridden the Indian Chieftain, the BMW 1600B, my F6B and the 2018 Goldwing.
    The Indian is nicely finished, has adequate but not exciting power, and it is fairly smooth for a twin. However, riding an air-cooled V-twin in southern Utah, where summer temperatures are routinely in triple digits (and the second digit is not always zero) is, IMO, out of the question. Besides, in the year 2018 I don’t fancy a bike that looks like something you might find under a dusty tarp in your grandfather’s barn.
    The BMW 1600B is a beautiful bike, impeccably finished, smooth and comfortable, it handles superbly, and the power, OMG the power, is out of this world. However, having owned two BMW “Z” cars, I am reluctant to rejoin the Teutonic admiration society. Put another way, BMW dealers (and owners?) have been known to have serious attitude problems.
    The F6B is an amazing bike and I loved it. It is smooth, powerful, reliable, comfortable, handles beautifully and it’s gorgeous. Unfortunately, its electronics are outdated, cruise control came late to the party (BIG mistake Honda), the stock suspension is not remarkable, and it desperately needs another gear. Here in the southwest, where speed limits are frequently 80 MPH, and people routinely drive 90 MPH, the engine spinning in the area of 3500 rpm can get a bit tiring on a long trip.
    The 2018 Goldwing is a thoroughly modern motorcycle with every imaginable bell and whistle. It is smooth, modestly more powerful than its predecessors, the front suspension is simply amazing, and it is a bit lighter than the previous models. Standard features include, but are not limited to, navigation, cruise control, ABS brakes, electric windshield, Apple Play, throttle by wire, key-fob access, and four riding modes (Tour, Sport (exciting!), Economy and Rain). With the available DCT transmission it also provides a forward and reverse “walking” mode and paddle-shifting if you select the manual mode.
    The down-sides of this bike, compared to the F6B, include smaller side bags, a slightly higher seat, and a smaller gas tank (although I have found the range to be about the same because of better mileage). And, unfortunately, there is the much higher price!
    It is the best bike I have ever ridden by a substantial margin, followed by the F6B. On a long trip, at least on my 600 mile trip returning to Utah from Arizona, I found it more relaxing than the F6B because of the automatic transmission, which is amazingly smooth and convenient, and the lower RPM (reduced 5-600 RPM compared to the F6B) at cruising speed.
    It is no exaggeration to say that this bike brings the motorcycle to a new level of comfort and sophistication. If I had to use one term to characterize riding this bike with the DCT transmission it would be “relaxing.” The seat is good, it is only spinning circa 2500 rpm at 75 mph, and the wind protection is adequate; perhaps a bit less than the previous Wing models, but good enough. And, there are genuine Honda add-ons to increase the wind protection.
    In terms of passenger comfort, there is a bit of controversy. Yes, it is pretty hard to top the “princess” seat of the earlier Wing models, but many test-passengers have rated the new Wing as “comfortable” and a few even thought it was more comfortable than previous Wing models. It is going to depend on the rider. The passenger seat no longer “surrounds” the rider like it did on the earlier models and the passenger “grab” handles are not very conveniently placed.
    The available luggage space is a lot less – no question about that. This is likely the most serious and non-controversial failing of the bike.
    If you want to play, you can hustle the DCT bike through canyons in the “sport” mode and give most sport bikes and crotch rockets a good run. It handles beautifully under all conditions; never a twitch, no “hinge in the middle”, and the automatic shifting is so smooth that it does not upset even the tightest line.
    All of that and the new suspension is so compliant that it has to be experienced to be believed.
    The 7-speed DCT transmission is really the piece de resistance here. I was originally skeptical and, in fact, my original order was for a standard 6-speed. Take it from me - you DO NOT want to do that. The DCT is simply marvelous.
    You start this bike with a tap of the start button (just like your car, just tap the start button and the computer takes over and starts the motor).
    The bike comes to life in neutral and in “tour” mode. Press “D” (drive) and just twist the throttle and you are going. The automatic shifting is smooth and positive. If you are in “sport” mode and you grab a whole handful on start-up, you will flatten your eyeballs.
    It down-shifts automatically when you come to a stop. The computer even seems to sense when you hit the brakes on a steep down-slope at speed, and drops down a gear to aid you in the braking; VERY slick.
    Or, if you want to make a quick pass, just hit the “down-shift” button on the left handle bar with your thumb and accelerate to pass; the transmission will then smoothly up-shift when you ease off the throttle after the pass.
    If you set the manual mode the rider is in control of the shift points with the paddle shifters. The paddle shift controls are perfectly placed ergonomically. In manual mode, the transmission will down shift, as required, when you come to a stop but it will NOT up-shift automatically.
    “Walking mode” lets you maneuver forward and back using the paddle shift controls; the down-shift button for reverse, the up-shift button for forward. This is VERY convenient for parking.
    I have never ridden the 6-speed, manual transmission bike. However, the reports from some of the testers suggest that it is much improved in terms of smoothness compared to the previous Wings.
    Finally, Honda is attempting to change the Goldwing culture, a notoriously reactionary culture, with this svelte and more “athletic” new Wing. I, for one, am happy to get with the program, but I wait and watch with interest to see what the consensus of the Goldwing community will be.
    I think that Honda hit it out of the park with this new bike!

    John Marshall
    Hurricane, UT
    Congratulations to both of you on your new rides.
    Thanks for the impressions/comparisons.
    Enjoy!

  5. #25
    Senior Member DaWadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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    Good write up. Definitely agree that the F6B is a looker. I'm not quite there with the looks of the new Wing but am in love with the BMW 1600B.
    2013 F6B in black of course

  6. #26
    Member keller123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    Huntersville, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane View Post
    From a 2013 F6B to a 2018 Goldwing DCT
    Some background:
    I have been riding for more than 50 years and I have owned many, many bikes; the most recent are listed below (obviously, some were owned simultaneously). The mileage given for each bike is the approximate mileage indicated when I got rid of the named bike.

    1997 Valkyrie Tourer (Black – 45,000 miles)
    1999 Valkyrie Interstate (Black – 48,000 miles)
    2001 Goldwing (Black – 125,000 miles)
    2004 Goldwing (Silver 15,000 miles)
    2005 Honda VTX 1800 (maroon and black, 15,000 miles)
    2007 Kawasaki 1600 Mean Streak (black with flames, 7,000 miles)
    2008 Goldwing (Red – 92,000 miles)
    2013 F6B (Black, 7,500 miles, wrecked)
    2013 F6B (Black, 75,000 miles)
    2018 Goldwing (Silver, new, presently ~1000 miles)

    I recently rode my 2013 F6B from my home in Hurricane, UT, to Sierra Vista, AZ, circa 600 miles, where I traded it for a silver 2018 Goldwing DCT which I then rode from Sierra Vista back to Hurricane, UT. In what follows, I will seek to compare my 2018 Goldwing with my 2013 F6B and two other bikes that I have test-ridden recently.
    First of all, the appearance:



    As they say, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”. In my opinion, the F6B was the most esthetically pleasing big Honda every made, at least until the 2018 model appeared. Now, I am uncertain as to which is the best looking. The downward slope of the fairing on the F6B, picked up by the slope traced on the side bags was inspired. The second generation Goldwing (2012 – 2017) had the same basic lines, but the effect was destroyed when Honda decided to go on the cheap, and carry over the first generation trunk to the second generation Wing; BIG mistake Honda.
    To compare the F6B styling to the styling of the 2018 Goldwing is sort of an apples vs oranges sort of thing. The styling of the new Wing is “edgy”; it reflects a more contemporary motif and clearly takes some getting used to. I like it a lot, but I can certainly see why many would hold that the F6B is more attractive.
    Why did I trade bikes?
    In the past 6 months I have test-ridden the Indian Chieftain, the BMW 1600B, my F6B and the 2018 Goldwing.
    The Indian is nicely finished, has adequate but not exciting power, and it is fairly smooth for a twin. However, riding an air-cooled V-twin in southern Utah, where summer temperatures are routinely in triple digits (and the second digit is not always zero) is, IMO, out of the question. Besides, in the year 2018 I don’t fancy a bike that looks like something you might find under a dusty tarp in your grandfather’s barn.
    The BMW 1600B is a beautiful bike, impeccably finished, smooth and comfortable, it handles superbly, and the power, OMG the power, is out of this world. However, having owned two BMW “Z” cars, I am reluctant to rejoin the Teutonic admiration society. Put another way, BMW dealers (and owners?) have been known to have serious attitude problems.
    The F6B is an amazing bike and I loved it. It is smooth, powerful, reliable, comfortable, handles beautifully and it’s gorgeous. Unfortunately, its electronics are outdated, cruise control came late to the party (BIG mistake Honda), the stock suspension is not remarkable, and it desperately needs another gear. Here in the southwest, where speed limits are frequently 80 MPH, and people routinely drive 90 MPH, the engine spinning in the area of 3500 rpm can get a bit tiring on a long trip.
    The 2018 Goldwing is a thoroughly modern motorcycle with every imaginable bell and whistle. It is smooth, modestly more powerful than its predecessors, the front suspension is simply amazing, and it is a bit lighter than the previous models. Standard features include, but are not limited to, navigation, cruise control, ABS brakes, electric windshield, Apple Play, throttle by wire, key-fob access, and four riding modes (Tour, Sport (exciting!), Economy and Rain). With the available DCT transmission it also provides a forward and reverse “walking” mode and paddle-shifting if you select the manual mode.
    The down-sides of this bike, compared to the F6B, include smaller side bags, a slightly higher seat, and a smaller gas tank (although I have found the range to be about the same because of better mileage). And, unfortunately, there is the much higher price!
    It is the best bike I have ever ridden by a substantial margin, followed by the F6B. On a long trip, at least on my 600 mile trip returning to Utah from Arizona, I found it more relaxing than the F6B because of the automatic transmission, which is amazingly smooth and convenient, and the lower RPM (reduced 5-600 RPM compared to the F6B) at cruising speed.
    It is no exaggeration to say that this bike brings the motorcycle to a new level of comfort and sophistication. If I had to use one term to characterize riding this bike with the DCT transmission it would be “relaxing.” The seat is good, it is only spinning circa 2500 rpm at 75 mph, and the wind protection is adequate; perhaps a bit less than the previous Wing models, but good enough. And, there are genuine Honda add-ons to increase the wind protection.
    In terms of passenger comfort, there is a bit of controversy. Yes, it is pretty hard to top the “princess” seat of the earlier Wing models, but many test-passengers have rated the new Wing as “comfortable” and a few even thought it was more comfortable than previous Wing models. It is going to depend on the rider. The passenger seat no longer “surrounds” the rider like it did on the earlier models and the passenger “grab” handles are not very conveniently placed.
    The available luggage space is a lot less – no question about that. This is likely the most serious and non-controversial failing of the bike.
    If you want to play, you can hustle the DCT bike through canyons in the “sport” mode and give most sport bikes and crotch rockets a good run. It handles beautifully under all conditions; never a twitch, no “hinge in the middle”, and the automatic shifting is so smooth that it does not upset even the tightest line.
    All of that and the new suspension is so compliant that it has to be experienced to be believed.
    The 7-speed DCT transmission is really the piece de resistance here. I was originally skeptical and, in fact, my original order was for a standard 6-speed. Take it from me - you DO NOT want to do that. The DCT is simply marvelous.
    You start this bike with a tap of the start button (just like your car, just tap the start button and the computer takes over and starts the motor).
    The bike comes to life in neutral and in “tour” mode. Press “D” (drive) and just twist the throttle and you are going. The automatic shifting is smooth and positive. If you are in “sport” mode and you grab a whole handful on start-up, you will flatten your eyeballs.
    It down-shifts automatically when you come to a stop. The computer even seems to sense when you hit the brakes on a steep down-slope at speed, and drops down a gear to aid you in the braking; VERY slick.
    Or, if you want to make a quick pass, just hit the “down-shift” button on the left handle bar with your thumb and accelerate to pass; the transmission will then smoothly up-shift when you ease off the throttle after the pass.
    If you set the manual mode the rider is in control of the shift points with the paddle shifters. The paddle shift controls are perfectly placed ergonomically. In manual mode, the transmission will down shift, as required, when you come to a stop but it will NOT up-shift automatically.
    “Walking mode” lets you maneuver forward and back using the paddle shift controls; the down-shift button for reverse, the up-shift button for forward. This is VERY convenient for parking.
    I have never ridden the 6-speed, manual transmission bike. However, the reports from some of the testers suggest that it is much improved in terms of smoothness compared to the previous Wings.
    Finally, Honda is attempting to change the Goldwing culture, a notoriously reactionary culture, with this svelte and more “athletic” new Wing. I, for one, am happy to get with the program, but I wait and watch with interest to see what the consensus of the Goldwing community will be.
    I think that Honda hit it out of the park with this new bike!

    John Marshall
    Hurricane, UT
    Hey great right up John, yeah I just may have not spent enough time on the DCT because I just didn't like it, especially in speeds under 25 30 miles an hour I just felt like the bike was clunking around a bit trying to find the right match, I'm not sure even with the paddle shifting how you can get complete control like you do with the clutch, especially when it comes to clutch, braking, slow maneuvering that I love to do. I'd be interested for any comments on that piece, I don't see how it's even possible to do that combination with the automatic DCT, and again gliding to a stop side seems to be completely off the table. I guess I'm just a control freak! LOL, I wouldn't hesitate though because of everything else you said is spot-on, to go with the manual full tour model, amazing the maneuverability and handling this thing has! I prefer the sport tour versus the tour sport for sure, I guess that's why I have an F6B. But again hearing complaints about the weak volume on the radio, I would definitely ask dealer to install the upgraded amplifier before I purchase. Again jury still out if that was just me and not adjusting things prior to the test ride or if indeed Honda messed up a little on the volume issue.
    Last edited by keller123; 03-14-2018 at 10:04 AM.
    When the world seems to be working against you. Drop everything and go for a ride!

  7. #27
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    3
    Quote Originally Posted by keller123 View Post
    Hey great right up John, yeah I just may have not spent enough time on the DCT because I just didn't like it, especially in speeds under 25 30 miles an hour I just felt like the bike was clunking around a bit trying to find the right match, I'm not sure even with the paddle shifting how you can get complete control like you do with the clutch, especially when it comes to clutch, braking, slow maneuvering that I love to do. I'd be interested for any comments on that piece, I don't see how it's even possible to do that combination with the automatic DCT, and again gliding to a stop side seems to be completely off the table. I guess I'm just a control freak! LOL, I wouldn't hesitate though because of everything else you said is spot-on, to go with the manual full tour model, amazing the maneuverability and handling this thing has! I prefer the sport tour versus the tour sport for sure, I guess that's why I have an F6B. But again hearing complaints about the weak volume on the radio, I would definitely ask dealer to install the upgraded amplifier before I purchase. Again jury still out if that was just me and not adjusting things prior to the test ride or if indeed Honda messed up a little on the volume issue.
    Keller123:
    Actually, now that I read what I said I was a bit heavy handed. Your concerns are Very real. The DCT does take a way a bit of control in much the same way that an automatic transmission in a car does when you are used to down-shifting a manual transmission for deceleration and corning control. And, coming to a stop sign is a very different experience with the DCT. However, I did find that it gets a bit smoother and more manageable as you get used to it; how you handle the throttle makes all the difference in the world. As a personal choice, I am willing to give up some control of the shift points for the convenience of not having to shift, but not everyone will willing to make that choice.

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