Installing a heated seat
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Thread: Installing a heated seat

  1. #1
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    Installing a heated seat

    I am thinking about adding the heated option to my upcoming Russel day long seat build. They supply the seat with leads that go directly to the battery but that will allow it to drain the battery without the key on. My question is, how did you wire yours so a dead battery isn’t possible? I am also wondering if it’s really worth the extra $200. I live in a warm climate and ride year round if I want to. I have a nice firstgear riding suit that will keep me warm but I love my heated grips and can only imagine a heated seat would be nice. What’s your thoughts?

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    Senior Member willtill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Av8er View Post
    I am thinking about adding the heated option to my upcoming Russel day long seat build. They supply the seat with leads that go directly to the battery but that will allow it to drain the battery without the key on. My question is, how did you wire yours so a dead battery isn’t possible? I am also wondering if it’s really worth the extra $200. I live in a warm climate and ride year round if I want to. I have a nice firstgear riding suit that will keep me warm but I love my heated grips and can only imagine a heated seat would be nice. What’s your thoughts?
    Unless you venture into the colder climates... IMHO you don't need a heated seat. Spend your money on something else.
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    Senior Member lloydmoore1's Avatar
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    If you have heated grips and use them then it’s a no brainer. Get the heated seat. I have both and use them. Its all about the comfort.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Av8er View Post
    My question is, how did you wire yours so a dead battery isn’t possible?
    You'll have to install a relay. The seat gets wired to the secondary side of a relay. The primary side of the relay is then wired to "keyed power." Keyed power means that the relay is turned on once the ignition switch is turned to the "on" position. Once the relay is tuned on, it then supplies power to the seat's control switch. For the seat to work, the ignition has to be on, and the seat's control switch must be on.

    Often aftermarket seats provide more heat then OEM ones.

    If you need to know how relays work, go here. I believe they call the primary side the "input" and the secondary side the "output."

    http://www.explainthatstuff.com/howrelayswork.html

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    Senior Member crossbowme's Avatar
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    I ride snowmobiles at -10 degrees without a heated seat by dressing properly. I'm sure you could do the same on a F6B.

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    Member Radical Taz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lloydmoore1 View Post
    If you have heated grips and use them then it’s a no brainer. Get the heated seat. I have both and use them. Its all about the comfort.
    I can’t agree more!
    I love my heated Corbin, and after the first time you use it you can’t believe that you ever rode without it.

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    Junior Member pikester's Avatar
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    That is one thing I miss from my old wing, is the heated seat. If you get it, I think you will really like it.

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    Senior Member Dirtstiff's F6B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossbowme View Post
    I ride snowmobiles at -10 degrees without a heated seat by dressing properly. I'm sure you could do the same on a F6B.
    Agreed, but have you ever ridden a snow machine that has heated grips and seat when it's below zero..heaven..just sayin.
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    Quote Originally Posted by druggr View Post
    You'll have to install a relay. The seat gets wired to the secondary side of a relay. The primary side of the relay is then wired to "keyed power." Keyed power means that the relay is turned on once the ignition switch is turned to the "on" position. Once the relay is tuned on, it then supplies power to the seat's control switch. For the seat to work, the ignition has to be on, and the seat's control switch must be on.

    Often aftermarket seats provide more heat then OEM ones.

    If you need to know how relays work, go here. I believe they call the primary side the "input" and the secondary side the "output."

    http://www.explainthatstuff.com/howrelayswork.html
    I use an FZ-1 Fuzeblock for all my accessories. A few are "always on", others are switched. Yeah, it's extra money, but every accessory is separately fused, easily connected, and the wiring becomes greatly simplified.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ths61's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by druggr View Post
    You'll have to install a relay. The seat gets wired to the secondary side of a relay. The primary side of the relay is then wired to "keyed power." Keyed power means that the relay is turned on once the ignition switch is turned to the "on" position. Once the relay is tuned on, it then supplies power to the seat's control switch. For the seat to work, the ignition has to be on, and the seat's control switch must be on.

    Often aftermarket seats provide more heat then OEM ones.

    If you need to know how relays work, go here. I believe they call the primary side the "input" and the secondary side the "output."

    http://www.explainthatstuff.com/howrelayswork.html
    I wired my auxiliary electrical toys through an auxiliary fuse panel that is switched by a relay controlled by the Engine Oil Pressure switch. The bike (and alternator) has to be running (not just the ignition switch on) to power these heavy draw items so they don't draw directly from the battery. This is a little extra insurance to prevent a drained battery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShanghaiDan View Post
    I use an FZ-1 Fuzeblock for all my accessories. A few are "always on", others are switched. Yeah, it's extra money, but every accessory is separately fused, easily connected, and the wiring becomes greatly simplified.
    Quote Originally Posted by ths61 View Post
    I wired my auxiliary electrical toys through an auxiliary fuse panel that is switched by a relay controlled by the Engine Oil Pressure switch. The bike (and alternator) has to be running (not just the ignition switch on) to power these heavy draw items so they don't draw directly from the battery. This is a little extra insurance to prevent a drained battery.
    There is nothing wrong with doing it that way too. A few years ago, I did the same with mine, and now-a-days, there are far better secondary fuse box options to choose from then there was back then. In my case, I had to add an external relay to power the fuse box

  12. #12
    Senior Member unsub's Avatar
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    I was under the impression that the heated seat plug was already part of a switched power relay that can be found under the existing seat. Adjacent to the passenger comms plug No?
    -Let's make Goldwings Great Again!

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    Senior Member 98valk's Avatar
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    Hey, on a side note, not a total hack:

    Does anyone know the wattage of a heated seat? I'm thinking of adding heat to my seat and would like to know what others use. TIA
    Albuquerque, NM

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    Quote Originally Posted by unsub View Post
    I was under the impression that the heated seat plug was already part of a switched power relay that can be found under the existing seat. Adjacent to the passenger comms plug No?
    Maybe on a full Wing. I don’t know that mother Honda ever offered a heated seat for our F6Bs.

  15. #15
    Senior Member unsub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sorcerer View Post
    Maybe on a full Wing. I don’t know that mother Honda ever offered a heated seat for our F6Bs.
    Hi Socerer, I pulled my seat off 3 years ago to install an OEM comms pigtail for my passenger (which is there) and I think it's located there in the same plastic casing and it's red. I'm tempted to pull the seat off to satisfy my curiosity but the seat bolts are too fussy to put back so I won't pull it off unless I have to.
    Can someone more knowledgeable chime in here?

    They didn't offer a heated seat but I'm guessing 90% +/- of the full wing electronics is prewired on the North American B.
    -Let's make Goldwings Great Again!

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    That would be nice!!

  17. #17
    Senior Member lloydmoore1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 98valk View Post
    Hey, on a side note, not a total hack:

    Does anyone know the wattage of a heated seat? I'm thinking of adding heat to my seat and would like to know what others use. TIA
    Here is the info on the type I installed on my bike. I have 2 pads with 2 switches both on separate 5 amp fuses.

    TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS:
    POWER:
    12 - 14v DC (MAX) input 12 - 14v DC output
    POWER DRAW:
    1.5 amps for a single controller and pad
    DIMENSIONS:
    34mm x 72mm x 9.5mm 1.34 in x 2.83 in x .28 in

    https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Saddlemen-Se...NZTKLa&vxp=mtr

  18. #18
    Senior Member 98valk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lloydmoore1 View Post
    Here is the info on the type I installed on my bike. I have 2 pads with 2 switches both on separate 5 amp fuses.

    TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS:
    POWER:
    12 - 14v DC (MAX) input 12 - 14v DC output
    POWER DRAW:
    1.5 amps for a single controller and pad
    DIMENSIONS:
    34mm x 72mm x 9.5mm 1.34 in x 2.83 in x .28 in

    https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Saddlemen-Se...NZTKLa&vxp=mtr
    Thank you very much! That is exactly what I wanted to know.
    Albuquerque, NM

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    Below are links to fuse blocks that have a built-in relay to power the switched side of their fuse box. The one I like best is the one from twisted throttle. The reason is because all the secondary wire ends going to the accessories are positioned well within the unit offering better protection. It is important to note that each assembly has a total amp capacity (usually 30 amps), with each circuit having a max capacity (usually 10-15 amps).

    http://www.fuzeblocks.com
    http://www.bigbikeparts.com/template...1&GroupGuid=16
    http://www.twistedthrottle.com/denal...or-motorcycles

    A few years ago is the one I used. The disadvantage with this one is that I had to run an external relay to power the key side of the panel. Also, the secondary wires at the side of the panel are more exposed. Because of other fuse blocks available today, this is an example of one I would not use.

    https://easternbeaver.com/Main/Wirin...PC-8/pc-8.html

    Because fuse block have limitations (max capacity 30 amps), some Wings will require 2 fuse blocks. An example is one with full heated gear for 2, and trailer wiring, not to mention additional lighting.

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